Electromyography (EMG)

EMG is most often used when people have symptoms of weakness, and examination shows impaired muscle strength. It can help to tell the difference between muscle weakness caused by injury of a nerve attached to a muscle and weakness due to neurologic disorders.
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Electroencephalography (EEG)

An EEG is used to look at your brain activity. It can be used to diagnose or monitor many health conditions, including seizures, brain infections, tumors, head injury, neurodegenerative disorders, and confusion.
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Injections

Dr. Somyreddy is certified to administer Trigger Point Injections to relieve muscle pain and headaches.
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Electromyography (EMG)

An Electromyography (EMG) is a test that checks the health of the muscles and the nerves that control the muscles. To perform this test, Dr. Somyreddy will insert a very thin needle electrode through the skin into the muscle. The electrode on the needle picks up the electrical activity given off by your muscles. This activity appears on a nearby monitor, and may be heard through a speaker. After placement of the electrodes, you may be asked to contract the muscle (such as bending the arm). The electrical activity seen on the monitor provides information about your muscle's ability to respond when the nerves to your muscles are stimulated.

    What to Expect:

  • No special preparation is usually necessary. Avoid using any creams or lotions on the day of the test.
  • Body temperature can affect the results of this test. If it is extremely cold outside, wait in a warm room for a while before the test is performed.
  • If you are taking blood thinners or anticoagulants, inform the person performing the test, before it is done.
  • You may feel some pain or discomfort when the needles are inserted, but most people are able to complete the test without significant difficulty.
  • Afterward, the muscle may feel tender or bruised for a few days.

Electroencephalography (EEG)

Brain cells communicate with each other by producing tiny electrical signals, called impulses, which the EEG measures. The test is done in the following way:

  • You lie on your back on a bed or in a reclining chair.
  • Flat metal disks called electrodes are placed all over your scalp. The disks are held in place with a sticky paste. The electrodes are connected by wires to a recording machine. The machine changes the electrical signals into patterns that can be seen on a monitor or drawn on paper. It looks like wavy lines.
  • You need to lie still during the test with your eyes closed. This is because movement can change the results. You may be asked to do certain things during the test, such as breathe fast and deeply for several minutes or look at a bright flashing light.

If your doctor needs to monitor your brain activity for a longer period, an ambulatory EEG will be ordered. In addition to the electrodes, you will wear or carry a special recorder for up to three days. You will be able to go about your normal routine as the EEG is being recorded.

    What to Expect:

  • Wash your hair the night before the test. Do not use conditioner, oils, sprays, or gel on your hair. If you have a hair weave, ask your doctor or nurse for special instructions.
  • Your health care provider may want you to stop taking certain medicines before the test. Do not change or stop taking any medicines without first talking to your health care provider. Bring a list of your medicines with you.
  • Avoid all food and drinks containing caffeine for 8 hours before the test.
  • You may need to sleep during the test. If so, you may be asked to reduce your sleep time the night before. If you are asked to sleep as little as possible before the test, do not eat or drink any caffeine, energy drinks, or other products that help you stay awake.
  • The electrodes may feel sticky and strange on your scalp, but should not cause any other discomfort. You should not feel any discomfort during the test.

Injections

Ruth Beger, PA-C specializes in Pain Management, and adminsters Trigger Point Injections and Bursa Injections.

Trigger Point Injection (TPI)

Trigger point injections can be used to treat a number of conditions including fibromyalgia, tension headache, and myofascial pain syndrome, which are given directly into the trigger point for pain management.


Resources to Learn More: Medline Plus, Medicine Net, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Lahey Hospital and Medical Center.